Getting Started In RC Models.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TOY RC CARS AND HOBBY RC CARS

The RC cars and trucks that you see on TV and in toy stores offer a great way for young people to get involved in a rewarding hobby; however, there are few similarities between these toy-grade vehicles and tproper radio controlled cars. For example, with hobby-grade R/C vehicles spares are available and you'll be able to make repairs yourself without having to send it back to the manufacturer. Also, hobby-grade R/C vehicles are generally made of better materials than toygrade vehicles, so they can withstand the severe punishment of a backyard obstacle course or a high-speed cartwheel at the local parking lot. Hobby kits are designed to provide long life and superior performance.

SPEED CONTROL BASICS

Our electric-powered models come with electronic speed controls. They're devices that allows the car to move forward at different speeds instead of just one speed like with a toy radio controlled car, as well as a reverse function to allow you to back your car out of trouble. Mechanical speed controls perform well enough, but ours come with advanced electronic speed controls (ESC). You'll find that an ESC allows much more precise throttle control, requires no maintenance, operates more efficiently, and saves both weight and space on your car's chassis.

WHERE TO RACE

Most hobbyists run their vehicles in informal settings. Backyards, vacant lots and unused, paved areas are where you'll probably find people driving and enjoying R/C vehicles. If you have a competitive nature, however, there are hundreds of R/C racing clubs and tracks throughout the country.

OFF-ROAD VS ON-ROAD

The most popular type of R/C car is the Off-Road Buggy. Big tires with "knobby" spikes, full-travel suspension parts and a high ground clearance allow the off-roader to go almost anywhere. On-Road cars usually have lower ground clearances, slicks tires, aerodynamic bodies, and are capable of a bit higher speeds.